Types of private supplies (England)

Under the Private Supplies (England) Regulations, private supplies in England are categorised into three types of supply:

Regulation 8 supplies are those where a water supply is provided by a water company, which is then further distributed by the account holder to a third party on separately owned land, who are not water company customers. These supplies require a risk assessment to be reviewed and updated every five years and sampling at a frequency dependent of the outcome of the risk assessment. Local Authorities may recover costs for these activities. A regulation 8 supply is depicted in the following schematic (note that all installations will vary): t

a “private distribution supply”. It shows a supply from the water undertaker, which via pipes, supplies a primary premises. This premises is a customer of the water company. The water is further distributed from the primary premises via pipes, to a secondary premises. This secondary premises is a customer of the primary premises and not the water company.
A schematic showing a Regulation 8 supply. The diagram shows a supply from the water undertaker, which via pipes, supplies a primary premises. This premises is a customer of the water company. The water is further distributed from the primary premises via pipes, to a secondary premises. This secondary premises is a customer of the primary premises and not the water company.

Regulation 9 supplies are commercial or public use supplies. They include supplies where the average daily volume of water consumed for domestic purposes is 10 m³ or more per day of water (approximately more than 50 people); or any supply where the water is used as part of a commercial or public activity such as breweries (irrespective of the volume consumed). These supplies require sampling for 2 groups of parameters at frequencies that are specified in the regulations, based on the volume consumed. The minimum frequency is once a year. A risk assessment must be carried out and reviewed and updated every five years. Local Authorities may recover costs for these activities. A Regulation 9 supply is depicted in the following schematic (note that all installations will vary):

an example of a “commercial and public use supply”. It shows a supply from a spring collection chamber or borehole, which is piped to raw water storage tanks, then from there the supply splits into two. One branch carries the supply to a hotel where is passes through a ultraviolet treatment unit, then into a loft storage tank. The second branch carries the supply to a village of multiple properties
An example of a “commercial and public use supply”. It shows a supply from a spring collection chamber or borehole, which is piped to raw water storage tanks, then from there the supply splits into two. One branch carries the supply to a hotel where is passes through a ultraviolet treatment unit, then into a loft storage tank. The second branch carries the supply to a village of multiple properties

Regulation 10 supplies are small shared supplies where the water consumed for domestic purposes is less than 10 m³ per day and where no commercial activity (including tenancy agreements) take place. Local authorities must complete a risk assessment and monitor these supplies every 5 years. A subset of regulation 10 supplies are those that serve a single premises only. Local Authorities may monitor these supplies and must do so if requested to do so by the owner or occupier of that dwelling. Local authorities may recover costs for these activities. A regulation 10 supply and a single dwelling supply supply are depicted in the following schematics (note that all installations will vary):

two examples of “single supplies”. The first shows water from a spring collection chamber which is piped to raw water storage tanks, on to a treatment room then to more than one untenanted dwellings. The second shows a supply from a spring collection chamber or borehole to a tenanted dwelling, via pipes and through a ultraviolet treatment unit before entering a loft tank
Two examples of “single supplies”. The first shows water from a spring collection chamber which is piped to raw water storage tanks, on to a treatment room then to more than one untenanted dwellings. The second shows a supply from a spring collection chamber or borehole to a single tenanted dwelling, via pipes and through a ultraviolet treatment unit before entering a loft tank

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